Read all the latest LAC News, Blogs, Events and Highlights here.

Legal Action Center Statement on Governor Cuomo’s State of State Proposals

The Legal Action Center commends Governor Andrew Cuomo on his continued efforts to shift drug policy away from criminalization and towards a public health response. As the opioid epidemic continues to devastate families and communities across New York, LAC applauds the Governor’s the proposals to increase access to addiction medication to treat opioid use disorder (OUD).

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Governor Cuomo Vetoes Legislation to Ban Prior-Authorization Requirements on Addiction Medications in Medicaid

Governor Cuomo passes legislation to remove prior authorization requirements for addiction medicine in commercial insurance but vetoes proposed bill to do the same in Medicaid. LAC is very concerned that Medicaid recipients in New York no longer have the same access to medications that commercial beneficiaries have and will continue advocacy to remove barriers to lifesaving SUD care for ALL New Yorkers.

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REMOVING PRIOR AUTHORIZATION REQUIREMENTS FOR All ADDICTION MEDICATION WILL SAVE LIVES AND REDUCE HEALTHCARE COSTS TO NEW YORK

As the opioid-related overdose epidemic continues to devastate families and communities nationwide, a new study shows that removing prior authorization barriers to substance use disorder treatment will decrease mortality and overall health costs in New York State.

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NY’s New Marijuana “Decriminalization” & Expungement Law Goes into Effect

For the first time ever, New York State has begun automatic expungement of certain marijuana convictions. Legal Action Center, which has long been advocating for automatic records clearance, created a fact sheet on the new decriminalization and expungement law along with the Legal Aid Society and Community Service Society.

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Urge NY Governor Cuomo to Remove Prior Authorization Barriers to Addiction Medicine in Medicaid and Commercial Insurance

It is critical that NY Governor Cuomo sign and pass A.7246/S.5935, legislation to remove prior authorization barriers to life-saving medication-assisted treatment for substance use disorder in Medicaid in the state.

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LAC COMMENDS GOVERNOR AND LEGISLATURE ON PASSAGE OF STATE BUDGET

The Legal Action Center (LAC) commends Governor Cuomo and the New York State Senate and Assembly on passage of a State budget last weekend that includes important advances in restorative justice and health equity that we – along with many in the criminal justice and substance use disorder advocacy communities – have sought for many years.

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Criminal Justice Reform Organizations Support Cuomo’s “mugshot ban”

Legal Action Center and other criminal justice advocacy organizations voice support for Governor Cuomo’s amendment to New York’s Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) that would ban the public disclosure of photos and booking information compiled by law enforcement agencies when they make arrests, mirroring policies already in place in federal agencies.

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LAC SUPPORTS GOVERNOR CUOMO’S PARITY AND INSURANCE REFORM MEASURES

The Legal Action Center applauds Governor Cuomo’s proposals to enforce parity and remove insurance barriers to improve access to substance use disorder and mental health care for tens of thousands of New Yorkers.

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LAC APPLAUDS GOVERNOR CUOMO’S 2019 JUSTICE AGENDA

The Legal Action Center commends Governor Andrew Cuomo on the landmark criminal justice and opioid and other substance use disorder (SUD) initiatives included in his 2019 Justice Agenda.

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Protecting the Identity of Pardoned New Yorkers is the Right Thing to Do

26 undersigned criminal justice reform organizations strongly support Governor Cuomo’s pardon of 140 individuals who were convicted of one misdemeanor or non-violent felony when they were under the age of 18, and his decision to keep the names confidential. These individuals should now be allowed to move on with their lives without the stigma resulting from these convictions, which occurred when they were minors.

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