Are you Somebody with HIV/AIDS? An Alcohol or Drug History? A Criminal Record?... (Updated 2017)

This booklet is for New Yorkers with HIV/AIDS, a substance use disorder and/or a criminal record who want to know their rights to be free of discrimination. It explains: laws that forbid discrimination; limits on what employers, landlords, and others may ask; how to get a job or housing despite the stigma of HIV, addiction, and a criminal record; and what to do when there is illegal discrimination.

Know Your Rights: Are You in Recovery from Alcohol or Drug Problems? (updated 2006)

This brochure describes federal laws prohibiting employment, housing, and other discrimination against people with substance use disorders. It also explains what to do if your rights have been violated. Also available in Spanish.

Conozca Sus Derechos: ¿Está recuperándose de problemas con el alcohol o las drogas? (2006)

Este folleto da a las personas en tratamiento o recuperándose, tan bien como sus aliados, la información necesaria para luchar contra la discriminación. Le da un descripción de las leyes federales que prohíben la discriminación en el empleo, vivienda y otra discriminación contra las personas con problemas de alcohol y drogas.

Employment Rights for People with HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and Substance Use Disorders (2016)

This training explains the employment rights of people with HIV, viral hepatitis, and/or substance use disorders, and touches on issues related to health and life insurance. The training focuses on federal and New York laws.

Know Your Rights: Employment Discrimination Against People with Alcohol/Drug Histories (June 2009)

This webinar explains federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination against people with disabilities, and how these laws protect people with substance use disorders.

Know Your Rights: Housing, Health Care, and Other Forms of Discrimination Against People with Alcohol and Drug Histories (July 2009)

This webinar explains federal laws prohibiting discrimination against people with disabilities, and how these laws protect people with substance use disorders, with a particular focus on discrimination in housing, government activities and programs, and public accommodations like schools and health care providers.

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